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Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

The Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences has a great diversity of programs and intersecting disciplines, with faculty and students studying in fields such as severe weather, the solar system, stable isotopes, and geophysics. We are committed to four strategic initiatives: Energy and the Environment, Severe Weather Science, Planetary Exploration, and Geodata Science.

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Planetary scientist puts Mars lake theory on ice with new study that offers alternate explanation

For years scientists have been debating what might lay under the Martian planet's south polar cap after bright radar reflections were discovered and initially attributed to water. But now, a new study puts that theory to rest and demonstrates for the first time that another material is most likely the answer. Briony Horgan of EAPS is cited in this article from Science Daily.

'Hotter and more humid': Dangerous extreme heat will impact Indiana in coming years

Historically, Indiana has experienced only seven days per year at 95 degrees or more. That could change in a big way. Indiana University’s Environmental Resilience Institute predicts that in the coming decades the number of such days could soar to as many as 38 to 51 days. Matthew Huber of EAPS is cited in this article from the Indy Star.

NASA’s new mission studies how intense thunderstorms may influence climate change

NASA recently began new research to investigate how extreme summer weather may be affecting the upper layers of earth's atmosphere. Dan Cziczo, Ph.D., a professor and head of the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University, is cited in this article from ABC News.

Full Steam Ahead Podcast Episode 112 – Perseverance Mars Rover Update

NASA’s Perseverance Mars Rover Mission is only five months into its mission and already impressing everyone involved. The rover, launched on July 30, 2020 and landed on Mars on February 18, 2021, and has been busy ever since. Last October, Full Steam Ahead talked with Briony Horgan, an associate professor of Planetary Sciences, in between the launch and landing about the goal of mission, its importance, excitement and nerves, and much more. On the latest episode of Full Steam Ahead: A Podcast About Purdue, CBS4’s Adam Bartels catches up with Horgan to discuss the emotion of Perseverance’s landing, what’s happened since, what’s next, and more!

Perseverance rover prepares to collect Martian samples that will be sent to Earth

Almost a year after NASA's Perseverance rover was launched on its nearly seven-month journey to Mars, the robotic explorer is preparing to collect its first Martian sample within the next two weeks. Briony Horgan, part of the rover's science team and associate professor of planetary science in Purdue University's Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences in the College of Science, is mentioned in this piece by CNN.

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Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 • Phone: (765) 494-3258 • Fax: (765) 496-1210 • Contact Us

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