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Geodata Science News

Perseverance’s first year on Mars: Purdue professor, mission team member looks at what is ahead
01-24-2022
Almost one year into the Mars rover mission, accomplishing its goal is on the horizon for Purdue University’s Briony Horgan and the Perseverance team. Feb. 18 will mark one year since the rover landed on the red planet following a seven-month, 300-million-mile flight across space. Horgan, associate professor of planetary science in the Purdue College of Science’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, said anticipation is building as the team focuses on the mission goal: researching a now-dry large river delta.

Asteroid material deposited during large impacts record the moon’s ancient magnetic field
12-01-2021
The moon has no core dynamo magnetic field, but spacecraft detect numerous strong localized magnetic fields in the crust of the moon. Many of these magnetic anomalies are antipodal to large impact basins. Scientists at Purdue University and the University of California, Santa Cruz, led by Brandon Johnson, Purdue associate professor of earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences, ran impact simulations that showed that during oblique impact, ejected material piles up at the impact antipode. This antipodal ejecta may be several-hundred meters thick. Much of this ejecta is impactor material, which may contain iron or other minerals that can become magnetized. The authors found that this material is heated by the impact shockwave and remains warm enough to cool after it lands and records the moon’s ancient magnetic field. Using the strength of these anomalies and the calculated abundance of impactor material, they found that the moon’s magnetic field had a strength of 40-73 μT at the time large impact basins were forming about 4 billion years ago.

Space dust analysis could solve mystery of the origins of Earth’s water
12-01-2021
An international team of scientists may have solved a key mystery about the origins of the Earth’s water, after uncovering persuasive new evidence pointing to an unlikely culprit - the Sun. Professor Michelle Thompson is a co-author of this international research.

Darryl Granger elected 2021 AGU Fellow
09-28-2021
Dr. Darryl Granger, Purdue University Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) professor, was elected as an American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) Fellow. He joined 59 other individuals in the 2021 Class of Fellows. Since 1962, the AGU Union Fellows Committee has selected less than 0.1% of members as new Fellows. AGU, a nonprofit organization that supports 130,000 enthusiasts to experts worldwide in Earth and space sciences, annually recognizes a select number of individuals as part of its Honors and Recognition program.

Dr. Elita Li joins the EAPS faculty for Fall 2021
08-12-2021
The department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University welcomes Dr. Elita Li as a new faculty member for the Fall 2021 semester.  Li comes to the Purdue campus in West Lafayette from the National University of Singapore (NUS) where she was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Dr. Elita Li joins the EAPS faculty for Fall 2021
08-12-2021
The department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University welcomes Dr. Elita Li as a new faculty member for the Fall 2021 semester.  Li comes to the Purdue campus in West Lafayette from the National University of Singapore (NUS) where she was an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.